Call for Submissions & Volunteers: Winifred Bryan Horner Outstanding Book Award and Nancy A. Myers Feminist Research Grant

The Coalition is pleased to accept nominations for two upcoming awards – the biennial Winifred Bryan Horner Outstanding Book Award and the biennial Nancy A. Myers Feminist Research Grant! Descriptions, eligibility guidelines, and links to submission instructions for both awards are below. To see a list of past award winners, and to learn more about our awards in general, please visit https://cfshrc.org/awards.

We’re also seeking additional award committee members for both awards. Reviewers will receive my deepest gratitude and will get the chance to read some excellent books and/or learn about cutting edge, emerging research! If you are interested in helping adjudicate either award, please reach out to me at sharerw@ecu.edu as soon as possible to let me know.

I am happy to answer any questions about the awards or the award committees.

All best,
Wendy Sharer, Immediate Past President and Awards Coordinator
sharerw@ecu.edu

WINIFRED BRYAN HORNER OUTSTANDING BOOK AWARD

The Winifred Bryan Horner Outstanding Book Award is presented biennially in even years for work in the field of composition and rhetoric to recognize outstanding scholarship and research in the areas of feminist pedagogy, practice, history, and theory. The award carries a $200 honorarium and will be presented at the Wednesday evening meeting of the Coalition at the 2024 Conference on College Composition and Communication.

An eligible nomination will have been published in the two years previous to the year of the award. (For example, a work eligible for the 2024 award will have been published in calendar year 2022 or 2023.) Single or multiple authored books, as well as edited volumes, are eligible. We welcome nominations from authors, editors, publishers, or readers. To be eligible for the award, a nominee must be a member of Coalition at the time of nomination.

Please see the Horner Award Page for review criteria and application details. Nominating statements and 5 (five) physical or electronic copies of the nominated book are due to Wendy Sharer (sharerw@ecu.edu) by December 1, 2023.

NANCY A. MYERS FEMINIST RESEARCH GRANT

The Nancy A. Myers Feminist Research Grant is also presented biennially in even years to help researchers discover, pursue, or continue feminist projects that require funding and funded activities. This award provides up to $700 for eligible activities, including – but not limited to – archival research, translation, interview transcription, and digital archivization and/or digital project development. It will be presented at the Wednesday evening meeting of the Coalition at the 2024 Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Please see the Myers Award Page for eligibility requirements and application details. Application materials are due to Wendy Sharer (sharerw@ecu.edu) by January 10, 2024.

Cancellation of Coalition at CCCC 2020

Dear Colleagues,

With real regret, the CFSHRC is cancelling this year’s Action Hour event, ahead of official announcements from the CCCC. We especially regret any inconvenience this announcement may cause for our members in timing or otherwise, we thank you for your support and your kind messages this week and prior, and we hope for clear pathways forward for all your institutions and communities.

Although the evening is cancelled, the Coalition’s work continues. The Exec Officers and Advisory Board will hold their annual March meeting as scheduled on March 25, but remotely. We will vote, approve, and announce a new slate, among other things. Please watch for more announcements in the days following, particularly regarding how we will either remediate or reschedule “Art in the Times of Chaos” and mentoring tables, how we will celebrate our award and scholarship winners, and how plans are shaping for FemRhet 2021 and 2023.

Between now and then, please be well.
-Tarez Graban
CFSHRC President 2018-2020
On Behalf of the Coalition

Coalition at CCCC 2020

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, many Coalition members are weighing a difficult choice regarding travel to CCCC. While we are heartened by CCCC’s close monitoring of the situation [https://cccc.ncte.org/cccc/cccc-2020-and-the-coronavirus], we are weighing those choices with you. We encourage all members to assess their situations and err on the side of their own and others’ safety and well-being. The Coalition is still scheduled to host its annual Wednesday “Action Hour,” featuring a keynote presentation by Dr. Alexandra Hidalgo: “Art in the Times of Chaos: Creative Collaborations Between Venezuelan Women Across Continents,” with interactive lecture, film clips, and Q&A, followed by conferral of awards and participation in mentoring tables. However, we will follow the lead of CCCC officers as they work to keep us updated on the coronavirus and any possibility of cancellation. We will circulate announcements should anything change. In addition, we are currently considering alternative options for enacting at least part of the evening, in the event of cancellation, and for disseminating results of the evening for those who could not attend. Those discussions are in the early stages and quite contingent; when more details are in place, we will share them.

With gratitude for you and your involvement,
CFSHRC Executive Board

Event: Connecting Coalitions, Arts, and Pedagogies of Human Rights at #4C20

Please join the Coalition for our annual SIG event before CCCC’s! Wednesday, March 25, 2020, from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Crystal Ballroom, Wisconsin Center

Keynote by Dr. Alexandra Hidalgo

This year’s two-part session will focus on making critical connections between filmic and other arts and the various kinds of teaching and activism we strive for in the contemporary classroom. The first part of the session features a keynote presentation by Dr. Alexandra Hidalgo: “Art in the Times of Chaos: Creative Collaborations Between Venezuelan Women Across Continents” with lecture, film clips, and traditional Q&A.

In this presentation, Alexandra Hidalgo will use film scenes and crew interviews in order to discuss not only her in-production feature documentary The Weeping Season, but also the cross-continental collaborative process she used in order to make the film. The Weeping Season is a first-person documentary in which the filmmaker investigates the mystery of her father’s 1983 disappearance in the Venezuelan Amazon. Hidalgo began filming this documentary in Venezuela in 2004. Since then, she has filmed in the United States, Portugal, and Spain. She was last able to film in Venezuela in 2016. However, her Venezuelan passport expired and due to the current political crisis in her homeland, she has been unable to renew it. In order to complete the film, she is collaborating with Venezuelan producer Natalia Machado and a group of local filmmakers, with whom she communicates through Skype and WhatsApp, in order to direct their filming. She is also working with Cristina Carrasco, a Venezuelan editor who lives in Argentina and Spain, and with whom she collaborates through Skype, Google docs, and WhatsApp to craft the story together.

Hidalgo holding a camera and young child.

As cofounder of the online publication agnès films and author of Cámara Retórica, Hidalgo has spent several years articulating a feminist filmmaking methodology for rhetoric and composition. As such, the making of the film itself mirrors the documentary’s themes of loss and crisis. There are the personal and national losses that occur through the filmmaker’s storyline, and there is the collaboration that occurs among three Venezuelan women who must find ways to work across borders given the country’s current crisis. The presentation will both demonstrate and argue for how Hidalgo, Carrasco, and Machado come together through digital technologies and apps in order to co-create a memorable piece of art in a unique enactment of the Venezuelan diaspora. Over three million Venezuelans have escaped their homeland’s crisis since the middle 2000s and the collaborative work on this film offers one model for remaining close to each other in spite of being geographically spread.

Mentoring Tables

The second part of our session will feature one hour of semi-structured mentoring tables on topics ranging from contingent labor to globalizing feminist historical work to developing new research methodologies to finding or maintaining a work-life balance, among other topics.

Continuing the Conversation through Lateral Mentoring and Sustained Collaboration

While our mentoring tables typically offer graduate students and junior scholars the opportunity to learn from senior colleagues in the field on various topics, several of this year’s mentoring tables will be co-hosted by affiliated group and/or organization leaders, with the goal of leading discussion about how to make knowledge from—or how to take rhetorical action on—the topics reflected in Hidalgo’s keynote presentation. Please stay for the mentoring tables and engage with any of the following topics:

  • Table 1: CCCC Latinx Member Caucus, with Christina V. Cedillo & Cruz Medina
  • Table 2: CCCC Transnational Composition SIG, with Thomas LaVelle & Ligia Mihut
  • Table 3: Feminist Rhetorics of Written Argument, with Kathleen E. Welch
  • Table 4: Giving and Receiving Reader Feedback, with Risa Applegarth & David Gold
  • Table 5: Globalizing Feminist Historical Study, with Karrieann Soto Vega & Bo Wang
  • Table 6: Graduate School and the Job Market, with Hui Wu
  • Table 7: History and Historical Methodologies, with Suzanne Bordelon
  • Table 8: Preparing for Publishing, with Lynee Lewis Gaillet
  • Table 9: Strategies for Research and Writing, with Jessica Enoch and Charlotte Hogg
  • Table 10: Writing about Community Writing, with Jenn Fishman & Sarah Moon

“Moving” Days

January through April, in an even year, mark “moving” days for the Coalition, in more ways than one. But this year began with a unique kind of movement: Peitho journal’s moving to a fully online format. If you haven’t already, please do check out Issue 22.1 (Fall/Winter 2019). Jen Wingard, Jen England, and Peitho‘s editorial team worked diligently to put out this beautiful issue, in and around constraints caused by our decision to redesign the Coalition website.

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Living Feminist Lives: Looking Forward & Reflecting Back on the Feminist Workshop at CCCC

Guest Blog by Rachel Chapman Daugherty, Texas Christian University; Lydia McDermott, Whitman College; and Patty Wilde, Washington State University Tri-Cities

Greetings from the 2019 Feminist Workshop co-chairs! This year’s workshop, sponsored by the Feminist Caucus, “Living Feminist Lives: Materialities, Methodologies, and Practices” continues a conversation that we started in Kansas City last year on intersectionality. Both a tool for “critical inquiry and praxis” (Collins and Bilge 31), intersectionality calls us to recognize intragroup differences in experiences of oppression and work to dismantle the systems that create such inequities. Using this lens to consider both professional and personal issues, we began to explore ways that intersectionality can help us recognize, challenge, and change the inequities that we encounter in the everyday labors that we conduct as feminist teachers, administrators, scholars, and rhetors. This year, we turn this intersectional lens onto our lives as feminists. Echoing Sarah Ahmed, we urge panelists and participants to ask:

ethical questions about how to live better in an unjust and unequal world…how to create relationships with others that are more equal; how to find ways to support those who are not supported or are less supported by social systems; how to keep coming up against histories that have become concrete, histories that have become as solid as walls. (1)

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No easy resolution to problems of diversification: showing up on March 13, 2019

Conversations I have had with Coalition members tell me that members of this group for any length of time hold one particular trait in common: a strong conviction that, while it is hard work to position oneself at school or in the profession, we cannot risk leaving that positioning up to others. For most of us (if not all of us), it is only through long, tedious and recurring processes of articulating our identities and negotiating others’ perceptions of them that we begin to fit well in any given context. Even then, our fittedness occurs incrementally through extant classifications (i.e., we might be identified as multi-ethnic for purposes of institutional data-gathering, touted as “the rhetorician/writing specialist in the literature department” as a way of proving intellectual diversity, or otherwise engendered to help fulfill a quotient for national ranking or standing).

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Re-Examining Intersectionality in our 30th Year

Dear All,

With CCCC 2019 notifications having gone out, we are pleased to share early details of the Coalition-sponsored session on Wednesday evening, March 13 (2019) in Pittsburgh!

Two-thousand and nineteen will mark the Coalition’s 30th year, and what better way to do so than through a critical re-examination of intersectional work? As usual, our two-part session will be open to all 4C19 conference-goers.

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Coalition Curated Guide to #4C18!

2016 CCCC Annual Conference The Feminists Are coming

As we polish our presentations, print our posters, and pack our bags, CFSHRC has prepared a list of sessions that may be of particular interest to feminists and to CFSHRC members. This is just a sampling of the feminist sessions. Let us know what we should add by commending on facebook or twitter!

Before the conference, follow our facebook and twitter pages for updates and reminders. We will also highlight a few sessions.  During the conference, you can also follow along to the #CFSHRC hashtag on twitter. And after the conference, check our website for summaries of feminist presentations at the conference. We will see you in just a few weeks! #TheFeministsAreComing!

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CFSHRC & 4C18: Mobilizing in Several Directions

2016 CCCC Annual Conference The Feminists Are coming
 
In advance of 4C18, we would like to acknowledge some of the many ways that CFSHRC members have been responding to the NAACP Travel Advisory, the CCCC Statement about it, and subsequent discussions. We also want to underscore our support for all Coalition members and the various choices they have made in relation to the upcoming convention.

In October, the Advisory Board met and voted to cancel the Coalition’s annual Wednesday SIG. We chose not to call colleagues to meet at 4C18 both in protest of the convention location and to signal our solidarity with colleagues of color under threat in Missouri due to the circumstances that led the NAACP to issue their travel advisory. Simultaneously, we began discussions with and among various ad-hoc committees, the CCCC Task Force on Social Justice and Activism at the Convention, the KC Local Arrangements Committee, and the Coalition membership at large. Throughout, we sought concrete strategies for supporting one another, including ways of mobilizing both on- and off-site in Missouri for the annual convention.

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