Fellowship Pods Registration Now Open! Register by 7-19

Hello Coalition!

I am writing to open the registration process for the Fellowship Pods Program. This program is intended to help foster community-building among the Coalition’s membership. You can find more details about the program, which will run from July 2021 through May 2022, here: https://cfshrc.org/announcing-the-fellowship-pods-program/

Steps to register for the program:

  1. If needed, activate or renew your Coalition membership here: https://cfshrc.org/membership-join/ If you are financially unable to become a member at this time but still wish to participate in the Fellowship Pods Program, please let me know.

  1. Read the list of themed pods here:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/151iFr7TDQVmofsHttyj2dFsBiXrhOXIssGXJy00DgHg/edit?usp=sharing (Remember: You can choose to join a pod without a pre-established focus. Joining a pod without a pre-established focus will allow you and your pod members to collectively decide how you will spend your time together.)

  1. Complete and submit the registration form: https://forms.gle/WJgAS2oavvrm5yQ79

The deadline to register for the program is July 19.

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions and concerns you have about the program or registration process. Also, thank you so much to everyone who proposed a themed pod. Unsurprisingly, your suggestions are amazing.

Sincerely,
Mudiwa
mpettus@mec.cuny.edu

BIG NEWS from Peitho

I’m happy to share two exciting happenings from Peitho!

  1. Peitho 23.3 is now live! Access it HERE!!! Big thanks to the Peitho editorial team–Jen Wingard, Temptaous McKoy, and Rachelle A.C. Joplin–for putting together this excellent issue and to Abigail Morris at East Carolina University for getting it formatted and posted to the website.
  2. We are thrilled to introduce Kelli Lycke as the new Peitho Web Coordinator! Kelli joins incoming editors Clancy Ratliff and Rebecca Dingo and continuing Associate Editor Temptaous McKoy to round out your next Peitho editorial team.
    image of Kelli Lycke, incomimg Peitho Web Coordinator

    Kelli Lycke

    Currently, Kelli is a second-year PhD student in the Rhetoric, Composition, and the Teaching of English program at the University of Arizona. Her research interests include public monuments, memorials, and other commemorative material texts. Kelli also enjoys experimenting with film and web texts as compositions, as well as teaching students how to use technology in new and interesting ways. When she’s not working or studying, she plays board games and bicycles with her two pitbulls. In her role as the Web Coordinator, she hopes to establish great relationships with prospective authors.

All best,

Wendy Sharer, President CFSHRC

Announcing the Fellowship Pods Program

I am happy to announce that the Coalition has established The Fellowship Pods Program, a non-hierarchical fellowship program to foster community-building among its membership. The program is designed to respond to members’ calls for a re-imagining and re-structuring of coalition networks that have fostered a culture of elitism and bias. Distinct from the Coalition’s existing mentoring programs that offer guidance regarding professionalization and publication, the Fellowship Pods program will provide space for members to think, organize, and revel with other members around collectively chosen topics and shared interests.

The Coalition hopes that the Fellowship Pods Program will help

  • disrupt charismatic models of leadership in the Coalition
  • encourage participants to establish and maintain relationships with the Coalition membership beyond the confines of Feminism and Rhetorics conferencing, and
  • foster membership collaboration on research, teaching, and community engagement & social justice projects 

The program will run from July 2021 through May 2022. In July, program participants will be assigned to a pod (small group of Coalition members), and, in their first meeting(s), members will determine the anticipated topics and activities that will animate their pod’s year-long dialogue and/or collective action. 

THE ASKS:

  1. If you are interested in the Fellowship Pods Program, please email me (mpettus@mec.cuny.edu) and then anticipate receiving an email from me later in the month that provides more information about the initiative, including details about the enrollment process. Note that, to register and participate, you will need to be a member of the Coalition. You can join the Coalition via our website. Rates are $10/year for graduate students and $25/year for faculty (other membership categories and options are available on the website as well). If you are financially unable to become a member at this time but still wish to participate in the Fellowship Pods Program, please let us know.
  2. The Coalition hopes that much of the community-building in the pods will happen organically, so pod members are asked to determine the focus of their fellowship in conversation with each other. Additionally, I want to honor requests that space for identity-based, career-focused, and other themed-pods, including pods based on hobbies and crafts, be created. Therefore, if you would like to join a pod with a pre-established focus, please email me the specific theme and a brief description of the pod you would like established by June 21, 2021. I will advertise these themed-pods during the general enrollment period so that other program participants may elect to join them, if they desire. 

(Note: If you do not wish to join a pod with a pre-established focus, your first action for the program will be to complete the enrollment process later in the summer.)

Please feel encouraged to email me with any questions and concerns. I am serving as the coordinator of the program during its first year, and I welcome all feedback about the program. 

Sincerely,

Mudiwa Pettus (she/her)
CFSHRC Executive Board Member-at-Large
Assistant Professor of English
Medgar Evers College, CUNY
mpettus@mec.cuny.edu

 

We Need You! Please Complete the 2021-2022 CFSHRC Volunteer Survey

Many thanks to all who have helped the Coalition this past year as we worked to make the organization and the Feminisms and Rhetorics conference more inclusive, accessible, affordable, and anti-racist. As we continue this important work, we would like to involve a broader swath of people in constructing concrete changes to our “business and conferencing as usual.”

To this end, we’re reaching out to members and supporters who might be interested in serving in different capacities as part of this change-making. We hope you will take a few minutes to complete our brief “2021-2022 Volunteer Survey,” available at the following link:

https://forms.gle/2djxLim4yBvsDSG98

Please submit your response by Friday June 4th. Thank you for your help!

Warmly,

Wendy Sharer, President

 

 

Resources for Fighting Anti-Asian Racism & Rhetoric

The Coalition celebrates the fact that, on May 18th, Congress passed the “COVID–19 Hate Crimes Act,” legislation that responds to the significant increase in violence against Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander (AAAPI) populations in the US since the beginning of the pandemic. The bill cleared the Senate nearly unanimously last month and now heads to the President’s desk for final signature.

The moves by our federal government to address violence and hate crimes against AAAPI people are urgently needed, but so too are the efforts of teachers, scholars, and activists seeking to change the stereotypical and dehumanizing narratives that enable anti-Asian racism. With the urgency of this work in mind, the Coalition hosted “Witnessing Anti-Asian Racism and Rhetoric: A Speaking and Listening Forum” via Zoom on Wednesday, May 5, 2021. Co-facilitated by Jennifer Sano-Franchini, Bo Wang, and Wendy Sharer, the forum invited attendees to share their experiences of Anti-Asian racism and rhetoric and their ideas and strategies for confronting this racism and rhetoric.

We know that many people were unable to attend the event, so we are pleased to share compiled suggestions from the session on the Coalition website. Please visit http://www.cfshrc.org and scroll down to the “Resources” section to find the “Fighting Anti-Asian Racism & Rhetoric” link, which will take you to lists of publications, organizations, and multi-media resources dedicated to identifying and eradicating anti-Asian racism. You will also find action ideas, compiled from the May 5th session, for individuals, scholars, teachers, and professional organizations.

Please check out these resources and help us to make them even more robust! We encourage you to share your suggestions for additions with Wendy Sharer, President CFSHRC, at president@cfshrc.org.

 

 

Peitho 23.2 Now Live!

https://cfshrc.org/peitho-journal/

The most recent issue of Peitho is now live! Take some time to enjoy tributes to Kate Ronald (compiled by Charlotte Hogg, Meredith Love, Lisa Shaver, and Ann S. Updike) and engage with outstanding, complex, and diverse feminist scholarship by Veronica Popp and Danielle Phillips-Cunningham, Jennifer Keohane, Amy Robillard, Rebecca Jones, and Rebecca Temple.

Many thanks to the editorial team Jen Wingard, Temptaous McKoy, Rachelle A.C. Joplin, and Jen England

Please Welcome the Incoming Peitho Editorial Team!

The Coalition is thrilled to announce the next editorial team for Peitho: co-editors Rebecca Dingo and Clancy Ratliff. The team’s first issue will be 24.1, fall 2021. As the biographies below attest, these two feminists bring incredibly deep expertise and impressively broad accomplishments to the journal. Welcome, Rebecca and Clancy!

Image of Rebecca Dingo smiling, wearing blue shirt with tan backgroundRebecca Dingo is Associate Professor of English in Composition and Rhetoric at the University of Massachusetts. She is a recognized national and international scholar who has pushed transnational work into the forefront of feminist rhetorical studies. She is the author of Networking Arguments: Rhetoric, Transnational Feminism, and Public Policy Writing, which won the W. Ross Winterowd Award in 2012. Additionally, with J. Blake Scott, she has edited the book The Megarhetorics of Global Development. Her work has been well-cited not only in rhetoric, composition, and communication studies, but also across other disciplines and sub-disciplines including feminist international political studies, global education studies, women’s studies, literacy studies, and disability studies. She has been invited to give workshops, seminars, and lectures in the US, South Africa, Lebanon, and Belgium on transnational and feminist approaches in rhetoric and writing, and she was invited by the United Kingdom Parliament of International Development Committee to offer a policy memo that comments on how their disability programs might be more inclusive. Having recently completed her responsibilities as Writing Program Director at UMass, she is currently working with Dr. Rachel Riedner on a monograph, tentatively titled Beyond Recovery: Reckoning with Race, Nation, Imperialism, and Exceptionalism in Feminist Rhetorical Theory, and has been developing courses in contemporary rhetorical theory and writing human rights.

Image of Clancy Ratliff smiling with black and white striped blazer, black shirt, and red and blue necklaceClancy Ratliff is Professor at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Her research interests are in feminist rhetorics, authorship, copyright, plagiarism, intellectual property, and writing program administration. She has published articles in Pedagogy (including an article selected for reprint in Best of the Journals in Rhetoric and Composition, Parlor Press), PeithoTETYCComposition ForumWomen’s Studies QuarterlyKairos, and other journals and edited collections. She has served on the NCTE College Section Steering Committee, the NCTE Executive Committee, the CCCC Nominating Committee, and several CCCC Task Forces. She has taught writing for 22 years, including teaching writing in the Ronald McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program, first-year writing, technical writing, speech, senior-level capstone seminars, pedagogy seminars for graduate teaching assistants, and graduate seminars in rhetoric and composition studies. Ratliff has directed seven dissertations and three MA theses and is directing others in progress. She has served in a variety of administrative positions, including Director of First-Year Writing, Director of Graduate Studies, and currently Assistant Department Head. She is the faculty adviser for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette College Democrats, and she volunteers with Second Harvest South Louisiana, United Way, the Acadiana Regional Coalition on Homelessness and Housing, and other community organizations. Ratliff is currently at work on projects in environmental rhetoric and local rhetorical campaigns to remove Confederate monuments in Lafayette, Louisiana and Florence, Alabama.

The Coalition and Editorial Board of Peitho would like to extend a special thank you to Jen Wingard for all of her excellent work as editor of the journal for the past five years. We are confident that Rebecca and Clancy will continue the legacy of cutting-edge feminist scholarship that Jen helped bring to Peitho.

Denouncing Anti-Asian Rhetoric

Coalition Members and Friends,

I share the statement below on behalf of the Executive Board of the Coalition. I also want to let you know that the Coalition is working to develop online events through which we might identify strategies for responding to the frightening rise in attacks–verbal and physical–on Asian communities and on Asian women in particular (see https://stopaapihate.org/reports/). We welcome your ideas for such events. Please feel free to contact me at the email provided below.

In solidarity,
Wendy Sharer, President
president@cfshrc.org


CFSHRC Statement Denouncing Anti-Asian Rhetoric

With hearts heavy from the murders in Atlanta, the Coalition of Feminist Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition issues a resounding denouncement of anti-Asian rhetoric and violence.This anti-Asian rhetoric, intensified as a result of the politicization of COVID-19, is particularly dangerous for Asian women, who have long been subjected to misogynistic stereotypes that position them as Othered objects of white male desire and domination. We see and we stand with our Asian colleagues, friends, and families. #stopasianhate

Call for Proposals: Feminist Workshop @ Conference on Community Writing 2021

Another day, another opportunity from the Coalition! We are pleased to announce that CFSHRC will host a feminist-themed workshop at the 2021 Conference on Community Writing!

The conference, to be held online October 21-23, 2021, will focus on the topic “Weaving Narratives For Social Justice Action In The Local, National, Global.” The full CFP for the conference can be accessed at https://communitywriting.org/2021-call-for-proposals.

At this time, we invite individuals and groups to submit 250-500-word proposals for the Coalition’s online, interactive workshop session. As described in the Conference on Community Writing CFP,

Workshop sessions  will consist of 90 minutes of interactive presentation and collaborative work with the audience. We encourage workshop facilitators to include both academic and non-academic stakeholders for community writing. Thus, successful workshop proposals will provide a theoretical background, a discussion of community context, a presentation of fruitful collaboration, and practical tasks for the audience that the workshop panel might facilitate. Experts lead interactive and educational sessions designed to help attendees learn new skills and processes that they can apply in their own lives and neighborhoods and at their own institutions or places of work. Past workshops have included sessions on fundraising, organizing activism, contemplative practice, and building relationships between college and community.

Proposals of no more than 500 words should be submitted by FEBRUARY 5, 2021 to Wendy Sharer at president@cfshrc.orgIn addition to a description of the proposed workshop, please include names, titles, affiliations and email contact information for all proposed workshop leaders.

Proposals will be reviewed by a subcommittee of the Coalition’s Advisory Board, and a selection made by March 15, 2021.

Descriptions of interactive workshops from previous Conference on Community Writing meetings are available online as follows:

Best,
Wendy Sharer,
President CFSHRC

Honoring Kate Ronald

Late yesterday, we received the shocking news that Kate (Katharine J.) Ronald passed away. Whether you are a former student or colleague of Kate’s at Miami U of Ohio or the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, or whether you enjoyed her grand and generous mentoring in other ways, we invite you to pay tribute with us to a woman whose absence will be keenly felt but whose work will continue to forward our field. As former Roger and Joyce L. Howe Professor of English, and former Director of the Howe Writing Initiative at Miami of Ohio, Kate married her interests in rhetorical history with WAC and critical thinking in meaningful ways. She was co-editor with Joy Ritchie of Available Means: An Anthology of Women’s Rhetorics and Teaching Rhetorica: Theory, Pedagogy, Practice. With Hepzibah Roskelly, she co-edited Farther Along: Transforming Dichotomies in Rhetoric and Composition and co-authored Reason to Believe: Romanticism, Pragmatism, and the Teaching of Writing. She also contributed dozens of articles and book chapters that helped raised the profile of women’s historical and theoretical contributions to rhetorical studies and to pragmatics. For years she was a regular feature at the biennial Feminisms and Rhetorics (FemRhet) conference, making her rounds between panels to offer emerging scholars her immense support, often building their confidence at moments when they needed it the most. At the 2011 FemRhet conference at Minnesota State University, she keynoted with Rebecca Dingo and Eileen Schell, deferring in her characteristically humble way to the other scholars for their work in transnational feminist studies.

Kate modeled a feminist ethic through how she produced her scholarship—collaboratively and generously—and what she produced—texts that valued equally theory and practice. She’s likely best known for Reason to Believe and the foundational Available Means, the best-selling book in the U of Pittsburgh Press’ Series Composition, Literacy, and Culture. Her scholarship also shows her gifts and skills as a teacher and mentor. The peer mentorship and respect Kate modeled is palpable in Lisa Shaver’s Peitho piece, “The Making of Available Means,” as Kate and Joy discuss their professional alliance and deep friendship that sparked the anthology and the sinew between the creation and teaching of the text. Kate did no less than help shape our field, and she did so in ways both charismatic and unassuming. No wonder she will be sorely missed, and how grateful we are for all she shared with us.

We invite all who knew Kate to share their memories and tributes by commenting on this blog post. We begin with a tribute from Charlotte Hogg, Coalition Advisory Board member and co-editor of the recently published Persuasive Acts (U of Pittsburgh P, 2020), an anthology that builds on the foundation Kate helped to lay in Available Means.

Tribute to Kate Ronald by Charlotte Hogg

When I was an undergraduate at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, I took Advanced Composition from Kate Ronald, who insisted we call her Kate. I still recall so much from this class, in particular how this riveting teacher put our writing front and center and insisted we do the same. I remember her talking about how she would read while blow-drying her curly hair—sharing productivity pro-tips years before it was the thing to do. To this day I use an adaptation of an assignment she had in that class. Even then, before I knew that rhet/comp was a field, I knew I wanted to be like her. I visited her office wondering what to do with my life; she told me about the field of rhetoric and composition, made a list of programs for me to apply to (this was before one could look them up online), and I did exactly as she advised. We didn’t really keep in contact over the years except for a few serendipitous occasions, and yet she continued to be a touchstone along my career. She happened to be on my panel at my first national conference (the inaugural Feminisms and Rhetorics in 1997). When drafting an article, I found just what I needed in one of her lesser-known pieces. My admiration culminated in co-editing (with Shari Stenberg) Persuasive Acts, a follow up to Available Means, and dedicating the text to Kate and Joy Ritchie. When I would run into Kate at a conference, I was reminded how she modeled what to me is the perfect academic: unpretentious but whip smart, generous with guidance without taking over, and witty as hell. She’ll remain unmatched in these qualities but still made me—and I’m sure countless others—strive to achieve them ourselves, which is what made her such an exemplar.