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Review of Retellings: Opportunities for Feminist Research in Rhetoric and Composition Studies

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Nanette Rasband Hilton


Overlooked Sources of Feminist Material in Unlikely Archival Collections: Recoveries and Reconsiderations of Writer Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’ (1844-1911) Letters to 19th Century Physician S. Weir Mitchell (1829-1914)

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Susan Ghiaciuc, Cathryn Molloy, & Vanessa Rouillon


Recoveries and Reconsiderations: Feminist Coworking Spaces as New Sites for Feminist Rhetorical Inquiry

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Jaclyn Fiscus-Cannaday

Abstract: In this Recoveries and Reconsiderations article, I present feminist coworking spaces as a new area of inquiry for feminist rhetoricians, mapping the topoi of why these feminist coworking spaces exist—community, inclusivity, and empowerment—to provide insight into future feminist research related to each topos. I conclude with lingering questions about the extent to which these spaces might give insight into how to use classrooms and other university settings to create equitable, inclusive work environments for undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty.

Silently Speaking Bodies: Affective Rhetorical Resistance in Transnational Feminist Rhetoric

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Ashley Canter

Abstract: In "Silently Speaking Bodies," I theorize affective rhetorical resistance: resistance that is performed both through words as well as physical bodies. I examine two instances of bodily protest: 1) a 2015 protest in the Apaa district of Uganda in which a group of elderly women stripped naked and chanted, “Lobowa, Lobowa”—"our land” in a local Luo dialect — to resist their loss of their land and other violence as a result of conflicts of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), and 2) a 2013 protest in which women in West Virginia shaved their heads to protest loss of land and economic security due to mountaintop removal for coal mining in the region. As just two examples in a broader trend of bodily protest, these cases call feminist rhetorical scholars and activists to question certain assumptions about rhetoric: namely, that if one makes use of traditional and appropriate means of persuasion, intended audiences will listen. For these protesters, this is not the case: both had previously spoken to stakeholders and government officials about their causes, but were not listened to. Driven to use their bodies to form collectives and make the destructive forces of global economic and political transformation visible to broader audiences, these protests call us to consider the ways embodied rhetorical action responds to neoliberalism, which cultural theorists and rhetorical scholars have theorized as a configuration of the global economy that upwardly redistributes wealth, circulates the market-based logics of individualism and competition, and authorizes destructive forces of capitalist expansion. By employing an affective rhetorical analysis, rhetorical scholars can continue to see rhetoric where it perhaps is not heard, activists can adopt these successful protest strategies, and stakeholders can listen and look to protests to understand the deep stake that individuals have in global neoliberalism.

Rhetorical Failures and Revisions in the Second-Wave: Emerging Intersectionality in the Ethe of Activist Zelda Nordlinger

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Megan J. Busch

Abstract: The archived materials of Zelda Nordlinger offer a glimpse into this emerging intersectionality in the second wave of feminism through the ethe Nordlinger develops in her writing. Her archived letters, speeches, and essays lean heavily on typical second-wave rhetoric, and much of her language demonstrates a disregard for racial and socioeconomic difference. Yet, there are slivers of emerging intersectionality seemingly at odds with her second-wave ethos, and it is in Nordlinger’s consideration of this intersectionality and her steps towards revision that researchers may better understand the historical shifts in second-wave rhetoric.

Indigenous Women’s Voices in the Colonial Records of South Africa: Asking for Permission

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Emily January Petersen & Breeanne Matheson

Abstract: This article tells the counterstories of women's voices in the colonial records of the Pietermaritzburg Archives Repository in South Africa from 1900 to 1932. The documents reveal a common constraint for Indigenous women working inside a colonial system: that of asking for permission from authority, particularly white men within a colonial hierarchy. These stories recognize women as agents who employ survival strategies within racial hierarchies. We call out the violence of racial hierarchies that claim to be restrained by their own self-created policies and continue to recognize that technical documentation can be a tool of violence and oppression.

Ghostwriting for Racial Justice: On Barbara Johns, Dramatizations, and Speechwriting as Historical Fiction

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Zosha Stuckey

Abstract: In line with movements that aim to realign power, decentralize whiteness, and employ more nuanced, coalitional approaches to race and rhetoric (Pough and Anderson), this article places the work of two black women at its center: Barbara Johns' 1951 nowhere-to-be-found speech that compelled a school walk out and eventually led to the landmark case of Brown v. Board and Dr. Cassandra Newby-Alexander's ghostwriting of that speech. Johns' speech does not exist in original form—there are no transcripts or audio of it. In making explicit the process of ghostwriting, 1) I explain—via an interview with her—how Dr. Cassandra Newby-Alexander, historian and Dean of Liberal Arts at Norfolk State University, composed the text of Johns' speech in preparation for its re-enactment; 2) I lay out how other writers have composed and might compose similar projects that involve critical imagination via oral histories and assemblages; 3) and finally, I devise how one might go about using this method as a pedagogical assignment. This method is an attempt to refigure knowledge collection by partially stepping aside as a white scholar; inherent in this move is tension around who should be collecting what knowledge as well as who should be refiguring how we collect that knowledge.

The Gift of Feminist Mentoring

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Rachel Daugherty


How to Get a Nonacademic Position An Essay on Serendipity—Personal, Professional, and Intellectual

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Lisa Ede

Abstract: The article is generously reprinted from Women’s Professional Lives in Rhetoric and Composition: Choice, Chance, and Serendipity, edited by Elizabeth A Fylnn and Tiffany Bourelle. Originally published January, 2018 by Ohio State University Press. https://ohiostatepress.org/books/titles/9780814213568.html

Editors’ Introduction

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Rebecca Dingo, Clancy Ratliff


Research on the Literate Practices of Field Matrons on the Hopi Reservation

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Mary Le Rouge

Abstract: In this article, family history leads to new archival-historical research on the Field Matron Program instituted by the Bureau of the Interior on Native American reservations in the American West during the early 1900s. Reflection on this history can provide clues as to how such culturally intrusive, destructive government programs can be dismantled and avoided in the future. Field matrons were employed by the U.S. government to conduct the cultural assimilation of Indigenous women by teaching Indigenous women how to cook, clean, sew, and act like white settler farm women. Field matrons were also involved in the forced removal of Native children from their families and placement in boarding schools, although some resisted this practice. The official correspondence of field matrons collected in the National Archives and Idella Hahn’s personal writings shows their concerns about assimilationist practices and reflects the rise and decline of the profession (and acceptance of its rhetoric) in the United States until the program’s dissolution.

The Last Time We Saw Lisa

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Vicki Tolar Burton, Tim Jensen, Kristy Kelly, Sarah Tinker Perrault, & Ehren Helmut Pflugfelder


A Letter to Lisa Ede: Thank You for a Life of Listening

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Asao B. Inoue


Deep Doldrums: On Loving (and Learning from) Lisa Ede

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Jessica Restaino


For Lisa: A Patchwork Quilt

Peitho Volume 24, Issue 24 Fall

Author(s): Michael J. Faris


Review of Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy

Peitho Volume 23 Issue 4, Summer 2021

Author(s): Brittany S. Hull


Review of Asian American Feminisms & Women of Color Politics, edited by Lynn Fujiwara and Shireen Roshanravan

Peitho Volume 23 Issue 4, Summer 2021

Author(s): Chen Chen


On Race, Feminism, and Rhetoric: An Introductory/Manifesto Flow…

Peitho Volume 23 Issue 4, Summer 2021

Author(s): Gwendolyn Pough and Stephanie Jones


Manifesto of a Mid-Life White Feminist Or, An Apologia for Embodied Feminism

Peitho Volume 23 Issue 4, Summer 2021

Author(s): Tracee L. Howell

Abstract: In this work of critical autoethnography, I interrogate my experience of perimenopause to present a manifesto as critique of white feminism, utilizing an analysis of Aristotelian persuasion and force (peitho and bia) as a call-to-action to white feminists to do better in response to the 1977 Combahee River Collective’s “Black Feminist Statement”. I further petition that the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of critical menstrual studies be formally recognized and validated within feminism, arguing that its focus upon the body—and its potential for embodiment as feminist epistemological inquiry—provide openings within academic feminism to center the experiences of scholars of color and, perhaps, for a praxis of an inclusive l’écriture feminine of the 21st century.

Black Women’s Rhetoric(s): A Conversation Starter for Naming and Claiming a Field of Study

Peitho Volume 23 Issue 4, Summer 2021

Author(s): Ronisha Browdy

Abstract: In this essay, the author generally discusses the collective body of scholarly work at the intersections of Black womanhood, Black feminism, and rhetorical studies that has significantly impacted the field of rhetorical studies over the last 20+ years. Although individual scholars have considered whether or not to identify “Black women’s Rhetoric” as a rhetorical genre, while others have named their individual research and pedagogical work as some variation of “Black Women’s Rhetoric(s),” there has lacked a direct and explicit claiming of “Black Women’s Rhetoric(s)” as its own independent subject area and disciplinary community. Using personal experience, and analysis of two texts identified as African American/Black Women’s Rhetorics, the author argues that Black Women’s Rhetoric(s) must be named and claimed as a rhetorical genre and unique sub-field of rhetorical studies. This essay concludes with a call for collaborative identification and recognition of Black Women’s Rhetoric(s) as a collective, while offering a framework as a starting point for future discussions.

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