Keyword: Peitho

Stick!

In a relay race, as a runner nears the teammate to whom she will handoff her baton, she signals her approach by calling out, “Stick!” Different from the stick that pairs with a carrot or the police officer’s truncheon, both instruments of discipline and (potential) violence, the sprinter’s stick is a shared object that changes hands in a split second which encapsulates months and even years of teamwork and practice.

One hand holds a green baton in a fist over a second hand, palm open to receive it.

As the 2014-2016 term ends, and I prepare to handoff leadership of the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition to Lisa Mastrangelo, our next President, we follow in the footsteps of the 11 Coalition Presidents who have come before us over the past 27 years: Kathleen Ethel Welch, Andrea A. Lunsford, Cheryl Glenn, Shirley Wilson Logan, Kris Ratcliffe, Joyce Irene Middleton, Kate Adams, Lynée Lewis Gaillet, Barb L’Eplattenier, Nancy Myers, and Liz Tasker Davis. (See years served.) All of us—along with all of the next Presidents—are thrilled to announce the establishment of a new Coalition Award: The President’s Dissertation Award, which will be given every other year at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference along with the Lisa Ede Mentoring Award and the Nan Johnson Outstanding Graduate Student Travel Award.

A list of 2014-16 CWSHRC AB members.

A list of 2014-16 CWSHRC Advisory Board members.

The Coalition team is anchored by the Advisory Board, which is comprised of 30 elected members, including the Coalition’s 6-person Executive Board. This term, the EB included President Jenn Fishman, Vice President Lisa Mastrangelo, Treasurer Marta Hess, Secretary Tarez Samra Graban, Immediate Past President Liz Tasker Davis, and Member at Large Nancy Myers. As the current term comes to a close, several AB members are concluding their service, and we thank them most sincerely: Maureen Goggin, Jacque McLeod Rogers, Dora Ramirez-Dhoore, Shirley Rose, and Liz Tasker Davis as well as Andrea A. Lunsford, who will become an ex officio member of the Advisory Board.

Ex officio or non-voting AB members provide both leadership and insight. They include both former long-serving AB members and colleagues appointed to specific Coalition roles: Archivist and Historian, Director of Digital Media and Outreach, Feminisms and Rhetorics Chairs or Co-Chairs, Web Coordinator, and Peitho Editor(s). In October at FemRhet 2015 in Tempe, AZ, we announced the next 2 conference locations: In 2017 our University of Dayton, OH, colleagues Liz Mackay, Patrick Thomas, Margaret Strain, and Susan Tollinger will be our hosts, and in 2019 FemRhet will convene at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA, hosted by Jen Almjed, Elisabeth Gunnior, and Traci Zimmerman. In the last months we also filled 2 new Coalition positions: Alexis Ramsey-Tobinne will serve as our first Archivist and Historian, while Trish Fancher will serve as our first Director of Digital Media and Outreach.

Action Hour Poster

Action Hour poster with event details(designed by Trish Fancher).

The real heart of the Coalition is the membership, and Coalition members, working together with feminist colleagues from all quarters of the profession, positively outdid themselves at CCCC 2016 or, as it was known on social media, #4C16. To start, 2 dozen colleagues, including representatives from the Asian/Asian American, Black, and Latinx Caucuses and the Disabilities Studies SIG, offered 12 concurrent microworkshops that engaged audience members-turned-participants in discovering new strategies for all kinds of feminist action both in and outside the classroom, both online and off. Coalition members also hosted 10 mentoring tables, where facilitators led conversations about everything from editorial collaborations and formulating research questions for historical scholarship to feminist WPA work, undergraduate research mentorship, and feminist transnational scholarship.

Cristina Ramirez pictured with her book, /Occupying Our Space/.

Cristina Ramirez pictured with her book.

During our Wednesday night session, we also announced the recipient of the 2016 Winifred Bryan Horner Book Award. The Selection Committee this year was chaired by Liz Tasker Davis and included Jane Donawerth, Liz Kimball, Arabella Lyon, and Hui Wu. They read 10 stellar works, which individually and together speak to the vibrancy of feminist scholarship in feminist pedagogy, practice, history, and theory in our field. With great pleasure and appreciation, they gave honorable mention to Carolyn Skinner’s monograph Women Physicians & Professional Ethos in Nineteenth Century America (SIUP, 2014), and they gave this year’s award to Cristina Devereaux Ramirez’s monograph Occupying Our Space: The Mestiza Rhetorics of Mexican Women Journalists and Activists, 1875-1942 (UAP, 2015) (Watch Cristina accept the award here!)

Whether you were in Houston for 4C16 and want to reminisce or you couldn’t make it and are curious, you can peruse the Action Hour program and click through Trish Fancher’s Storify retrospective: #thefeministsarecoming #4C16. It just may be the case that two hashtags related to our activities were the most tweeted during the conference: #FemU, the hashtag microworkshop leader Christine Martorana asked us to use, inspired by the Bitch Media article “Beyond the Feminist Classroom” by Trish Kahle; and our very own hashtag, #CWSHRC! You can even see for yourself via video:

 

For my part, I can think of no better way to have started the Houston convention and no better way to end the 2014-2016 term. As we race ahead to not only a new term but also new leadership on the Executive and Advisory Boards, a new editor at the helm of our journal, Peitho, and new ways of naming ourselves and working together, I know I look forward to all of it and especially to coalitioning with all of you.

 

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In the fore, Charlie Cat sits with an Action Hour program; behind her, a fortune teller cat contemplates the past, present, and future.

 

 

 

CWSHRC seeks Web Designer

Image Caption: CWSHRC SEEKS WEB DESIGNER FOR JOURNAL’S REINVENTION. Peitho will relaunch Fall/Winter 2015 w/media-rich content (webtexts, video). Share your vision & get paid ($500-1K). New platform/format must be compatible w/current one plus improve media-rich content delivery, accessibility, searchability. Timeframe: 4 months (5/1/-9/1). Application deadline: 17 April. BE THE ARCHITECT OF *PEITHO* 2.0

The Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition seeks an individual with web experience to help redesign the online platform for its scholarly journal, Peitho. The timeframe for desired work is 1 May to 1 September 2015.

Peitho is currently hosted at http://peitho.cwshrc.org and operates on a WordPress platform. Since its conversion to an online peer-reviewed journal, Peitho has elicited a growing number of web-based submissions and media-rich contributions that call for a more flexible and sophisticated format.

With that in mind, a new journal platform and format should enable:

  • improved accessibility, including but not limited to providing SEO and article indexing capabilities (optimized for Google Scholar/Google searches);
  • integration with current member services (i.e., PayPal, membership lists);
  • publication of increasingly sophisticated media-rich content, including webtexts, audio-visual publications, and so on;
  • appropriate backend access for editors and editorial staff;
  • easy updating by current and future journal staff;
  • sustainability over time.

The new journal platform and format should also:

  • retain the http://peitho.cwshrc.org URL;
  • remain technically compatible with the cwshrc.org platform, whether or not the journal continues to use WordPress*;
  • remain visually compatible with the cwshrc.org site, incorporating the Peitho logo and a complementary color scheme;
  • enfold existing content, ensuring it remains accessible and is accurately indexed. 

The budget range for this project is $500-$1000. The timeframe for completing this job is five months: May 1st to September 1st, 2015. The Peitho editorial team intends to publish the Fall/Winter 2015 issue using the new journal format in September 2015.

Please direct questions about the redesign to Jenny Bay, Jenn Fishman, and Lindal Buchanan.

Submit proposal (including estimate and rationale for proposed fee), portfolio, and resumé by 17 April 2015 to Lindal Buchanan.

*While the Coalition will consider proposals that include use of platforms other than WordPress, both compatibility and cost are matters of significant concern. Proposals for migrating to a new platform should offer detailed information as well as a strong rationale and a full accounting of initial as well as annual fees that might be involved.

The Critical Work of the *Peitho* Associate Editor

A guest blog by Peitho editors Jenny Bay and Patricia Sullivan

The call for Peitho‘s assistant editor describes the job in this way:

The Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition (CWSHRC) seeks an Associate Editor for Peitho, its biannual peer-reviewed online journal. The Associate Editor is responsible for book reviews in each issue; for following up with authors who receive revise and resubmits and, if desired, finding mentors to assist them with interpreting reviewer comments and refining drafts; and for coordinating efforts with the journal Editors. Additionally, the selected applicant can expect to participate in Editorial Team meetings, CWSHRC Advisory Board meetings, and the CWSHRC Wednesday night open meeting held annually at the Conference for College Composition and Communication. For full consideration, applications are due 12/10/14.

From our perspectives as editors, the associate editor contributes work that is critical to achieving the feminist goals of the journal in terms of mentoring less experienced researchers and honoring feminine ways of coming to know. Let us say more.

This post addresses two questions from our perspective: what does the above description mean to us, and who should consider applying for the position of associate editor of Peitho?

What is the job?
We are trying in Peitho to serve two mistresses: one that preserves the scholarly double-blind review that is preferred for academic promotions and the second that seeks to mentor scholars by using feminist support. The editor(s) oversee(s) the first role and the associate editor oversees the second.

Mentoring is a major plank for the journal, and it is one of the associate editor’s major responsibilities. The coalition believes in peer mentoring of researchers; thus, we institutionally support scholars by having the associate editor oversee mentoring for those scholars whose article submissions to Peitho call for revision. This does not mean that the associate editor does developmental editing for all submissions that receive “revise and resubmit.” Instead, authors will be advised that mentoring is available and is coordinated by the associate editor. Those who contact the associate editor will be paired with an editorial board member and that person will work together to plan how the revision can go. The “mentor” will ultimately help the author assess when the revision is ready for resubmission. The associate editor keeps this work on track as best she can.

Peitho is also a journal that believes in book reviews. So handling book reviews is the other major part of the associate editor’s job. The associate editor solicits book reviews that are appropriate for the journal and helps manage their submissions and copyediting.

Who is needed?
Our ideal associate editor will be someone with tenure and/or years of experience with the study of women in rhetoric and composition. A wise woman such as Lisa Mastrangelo, our out-going associate editor, is needed.

We also want to solicit someone who has a vision for the future of feminist scholarship and work in the field.

Not all scholars in the Coalition hold positions that include work with graduate students, and those scholars have much mentoring to share. This position would help the associate editor demonstrate the mentoring of less experienced scholars for promotion purposes. It would also provide an outlet to give advice and assistance to newer scholars.

For full consideration, applications are due 12/10/2014. The online submission form is available on the Peitho webiste. Please direct questions to Peitho editors Jenny Bay and Patricia Sullivan.

Volunteer to Mentor a CWSHRC Scholar

Mentoring is an activity and ethos fundamental to the CWSHRC, and this year Coalition members have a unique opportunity to mentor scholars who are knee-deep in important new work. Read on for details, including the 9/21 deadline for volunteering. 

As you may recall, our Wednesday night session  at the CCCC in Tampa will begin with an hour-long New Work Showcase featuring 12 scholars’ simultaneous, showcase-style presentations of new work. This group will also remediate their presentations for inclusion in the Spring 2015 issue of Peitho.

To prepare, we are matching each scholar with a mentor. Specifically, are pairing presenters with Coalition members

  1. whose scholarly interests and expertise overlap,
  2. who can offer suggestions and feedback on presenters’ mediation plans for the conference;
  3. who can also offer suggestions and feedback on presenters’ remediation plans for Peitho.

Nota bene: Conference presentations include posters, audio-visual laptop displays, brief activities, and so on. Peitho remediations will translate face-to-face presentations into formats that will be meaningful and accessible to online journal readers. The latter are *not* meant to extend conference presentations into full-length articles.

To become a mentor, review the list of Showcase presentations below and email me your request no later than Sunday, September 21st.

Best and looking forward!
Jenn, CWSHRC President (2014-2016)

2015 CCCC/CWSHRC New Work Showcase Presentations

1. From Research to Archive Building: A Model for Feminist Scholars Working with and for “Participants—This project is a prototype for a digital archive I hope to make with and for former unwed mothers. A StoryCorps-style interview will capture two mothers’ memories of being shamed and silenced, hiding their pregnancies, and relinquishing their children for adoption.

2. “Making the Most and Best Use of Eggs”: Producer-Consumers, Modernist Labor Periodicals, and the Rhetoric of The Farmer’s Wife—The Farmer’s Wife (c. 1906) is a periodical as unique as its intended audience. But should it remain a “ladies’ magazine” in scholarship? Or can connections be made to rhetorics of labor? This speaker will confront these questions, exploring 1916 issues of TFW & other magazines.

3. Recasting Aurora in a New Light: Rhetorical Agency, Genocide, and Cinema—The subject of this project is Aurora Mardaganian, a survivor of the Armenian Genocide and a historical figure in American silent-cinema. As a historiographical recovery effort, it will examine the rhetorics Mardaganian deployed in order to understand what has not been considered or has yet to be theorized about Mardaganian’s rhetorical agency.

4. Madams, Memory, and Myth in a Wide-Open Mining Town—This project examines rhetorical patterns of historic discourse that enabled the open secret presence of brothel-based sex work in a rural northern Idaho mining town from 1894-1991. How do community values negotiated through gossip impact the way we create and change culture?

5. “I Apologize”: Promiscuous Audiences, Surveillance, and the Risks of Televised and Online Black Feminist Discourse—Ironically, successful shows like MSNBC’s “Nerdland” seem to amplify threats against Black women after verbal missteps. By analyzing recent controversies through a reimagining of the “promiscuous audience” (Zaeske 1995), this paper considers how to reduce risks of public activism.

6. Introducing the Digital Archive of the Colored State Normal School of Elizabeth State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina—Resisting an essentialist view of the New England normal school and southern black industrial school, this presentation employs strategic listening to the journalist writings of young female teachers committed to literacy and community uplift despite legal disenfranchisement.

7. A Decade of Growth: An Overview of Feminist Research Methods and Methodologies—This presentation reports on feminist studies published in six leading journals in rhetoric and composition. This overview presents the types of feminist work valued in the discipline, and it identifies sites of intervention that feminist scholars should attune to in the future.

8. Middle Eastern Feminist Rhetorics—To challenge the persistent silencing of Middle Eastern women and address their exclusion from histories of rhetoric, this presentation reads contributions of Lebanese and Arab feminists to Al-Raida (1976-present) as integral to understanding contemporary transnational rhetorics.

9. Doing it All the Time: A Queer Consent Workshop—In queer and pro-sex feminist communities, sexual consent is an embodied process and a set of teachable practices. This mini-workshop uses the methodology of peer education to teach consent. Participants will learn consent practices and get consent zines as takeaways.

10. Black Feminists Make Online Community not War over Beyoncé and Feminism—In 2013, singer Beyoncé asserted herself as a feminist in her self-titled visual album. This project uses computer-mediated discourse analysis (Herring 2004) of blog responses to the album to demonstrate how Black female bloggers build community through both assent and dissent.

11. Conscious Cleansing: Rhetorics of Reconciliation and Ireland’s Magdalen Laundries—This showcase will examine the impact of the Irish government’s apology to Magdalen laundry survivors as an act that alters the rhetorical space afforded to victims. As a way forward, a rhetoric of reconciliation is offered in conjunction with the work of Christine de Pizan.

12. Cross(dress)ing the Mason-Dixon Line: Recovering Rhetorical Histories that Disrupt Normative Notions of Gender—Featuring two memoirs that portray women’s experiences as crossdressing spies and soldiers in the American Civil War, this presentation advocates for recovery and study of histories that illuminate and disrupt assumptions about gender within rhetoric and composition scholarship.

A Unicorn, Butterflies, and Rainbows, Coalition Style

If you follow the Coalition on Facebook or Twitter then you know May 5th turned out to be a banner day. In the throes of third quarter for some and the end of the semester and academic year for others, the meme to the right turned out to a rallying cry for our membership—along with more than 5000 of our friends, friends of our friends, friends of friends of our friends, and so on.

Oh, how tempting it is to try turning that runaway meme into an ad hoc membership drive. Oh so very, very tempting.

Instead, I offer everyone reading this post a unicorn, a variation on the theme of butterflies, and some rainbows.

To start, a unicorn along with the first rainbow:

This particular unicorn and the figure we now know as Everyprofessor, all revved up to grade all the things, are both the work of Allie Brosh. Although she did not create the meme, she is well known through her website, Hyperbole and a Half, her book by the same name, and all kinds of cool swag. Brosch writes humorously and movingly about any number of subjects, including her own childhood and depression. Increasingly, her work appears on rhetoric and composition syllabi alongside Lynda Barry‘s, Alison Bechdel‘s, and others’. When you have a chance, take a look. Meanwhile, we owe Brosh one heckuva hat tip.

As for butterflies, they’re aspirational. At least here along the shores of Lake Michigan it’s early for caterpillars let alone butterflies. As a substitute, how about a button? Back in March at #4C14 we gave everyone able to attend the Coalition’s 25th Anniversary Gala a keepsake pin. Today we pair it with a button. Specifically, and thanks to Alli Crandell, our most wonderful webmistress, we offer you a  Peitho recommendation button.

Click it and you’ll find yourself on a page with a short form where you can tell Peitho‘s editors about colleagues with as-yet-unpublished projects on feminist research, histories of women, and/or studies of gender and sexuality in rhetoric and composition. If you are attending conferences this summer, starting with RSA in San Antonio, try it out. Please, too, let us know if you have any problems or suggestions for how it can be improved.

Now rainbows, a topic that has at least some of you thinking about 4Cs, Cs the Day, and those ever-sought-after Sparkleponies. (If you missed the post-conference controversy, read all about it herehere, here, and here.) Whether you plan to celebrate the sixth year of the conference’s first (formal) augmented reality game at #4C15 or not, as you get ready to upload your proposals plan to use Joyce Carter’s innovative keyword system to help Coalition members identify—and attend!—your sessions.

So far, three keywords have emerged as Coalition members’ favorites: Coalition, CWSHRC, and FemRhet. If your session addresses feminist research, histories of women, and studies of gender and sexuality in rhetoric and composition, use one or more of these terms, and next spring we’ll be there.

As promised, then, a unicorn, butterflies (more and less), and rainbows. Check this space again in a week or two for news about the Coalition’s 2014-15 volunteer survey among other things.