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Toward Trans Rhetorical Agency: A Critical Analysis of Trans Topics in Rhetoric and Composition and Communication Scholarship

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 4 Summer 2020

Author(s): GPat Patterson & Leland G. Spencer

Abstract: This article offers a critical literature review of the emerging discipline of trans rhetorics. To acknowledge common points of interest, as well as interdisciplinary collaborations that cut across both fields, the authors examine published scholarship on trans rhetorics emerging out of rhetoric & composition and communication. The literature review is organized around the following four topics: trans representations in popular culture, trans activism, trans rhetorical pedagogies, and trans rhetorical methodologies. While the authors address the emerging trends and gaps in trans rhetorical studies, the authors also turn readers’ attention to the socio-political consequences of academic research, arguing that researchers should prioritize projects that emphasize trans people’s rhetorical agency.

Happiness, Biopolitics, and Transmedicine’s Necessary Contradiction: Rhetorics of Normalcy and the Narratives of Gender Transition

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 4 Summer 2020

Author(s): D.T. McCormick

Abstract: This article rhetorically analyzes Andrea Long Chu’s controversial New York Times opinion piece “My New Vagina Won’t Make Me Happy” by contextualizing its epideictic appeal against the continuing history of gatekeeping and diagnostic restrictions within transgender medicine. By providing an overview of the controversy surrounding her autobiographical account of transmedical experience, as well as the biopolitical relation between trans life and affective ends such as “happiness,” I argue that Chu’s essay asserts—in a somewhat flawed manner—a necessary rejoinder to the contemporary push toward trans normalcy.

Toward a Trans Sovereignty: Why We Need Indigenous Rhetorics to Decolonize Gender and Sexuality

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 4 Summer 2020

Author(s): Rachel Presley

Abstract: This exploratory essay seeks to orient transgender rhetorics towards a non-white, Indigenous vocabulary. In disrupting and dislocating our rhetorical landscape from its traditionally settler context, I offer Native Two-Spirit critique as a particular productive departure from the conventional conceptualization of Euromerican GLBTQ taxonomies. I draw upon Native critical theorists, such as Qwo-Li Driskell, Brian Joseph Gilley, Scott Lauria Morgensen, and Andrea Smith to echo the call that any decolonial movement within trans, queer, and feminist studies must work to examine the ways in which heteropatriarchy intersects with settler colonialism.

How Ya Mama’n’em?: Blackness, Nonbinariness, and Radical Subjectivity

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 4 Summer 2020

Author(s): Marquis Bey

Abstract: This essay thinks through the nonbinary pronoun "they" and its proximity to black vernacular usages of the word as a descriptor of a certain kind of openness to subjectivity. This tendency is brought into conversation with gender nonbinary thinking around they pronouns. In other words, there is something to the pervasive usage of "they" (e.g. "How ya mama and them?" "Where they do that at?") that speaks to the presence of (gender) nonbinarism as intimate with a notion of blackness.

“It’s a … [inaudible blood-curdling screams, chaos]!”: Gender Reveal Party Fails as Ideological Rupture

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 4 Summer 2020

Author(s): Benny LeMaster

Abstract: In this essay, I theorize gender reveal parties as performative iterations of racist cisheterosexist ideology. In turn, gender reveal party fails are understood as ideological ruptures that refuse the saliency of racist cisheterosexism. I accomplish this both on the page and on the mediated stage. In this essay (the page), I explore the theoretical ground informing my performance (the mediated stage) of trans monstrosity including understanding the implications of gender reveal party fails as being rife with political potential.

GET THE FRAC IN! Or, The Fractal Many-festo: A (Trans)(Crip)t1

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 4 Summer 2020

Author(s): Sophia Maier, V. Jo Hsu, Christina V Cedillo, & M. Remi Yergeau


Because Trans People Are Speaking: Notes on Our Field’s First Special Issue on Transgender Rhetorics

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 4 Summer 2020

Author(s): GPat Patterson


Review of Domestic Occupations: Spatial Rhetorics and Women’s Work

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Sarah Walden


Review of Crazy Horse Weeps: The Challenge of Being Lakota in White America

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Lora Mendenhall


Review of Re/Orienting Writing Studies: Queer Methods, Queer Projects

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Gavin P. Johnson and Cody Jackson


Review of Not One More! Feminicidio on the Border

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Catherine Chaput and Alison Moore


After the Ink Dried but Before History was a Woman’s

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Sarah Richardson

Abstract: This article adds to the remembrance of women who have made significant contributions to the autonomy of women’s representations of identity. Olive Oatman’s identity was formed through captivity narratives and newspaper articles written about her, removing her voice and opinion, forging an identity that fell into the expectations for women of the time. Drawing from current feminist theory and using Olive Oatman’s lecture notes, I analyze the rhetorical choices Oatman made to re-claim her identity and disrupt patriarchal expectations. This article argues that examining Olive Oatman’s rhetorical choices helps remember and regain authority for women who made significant advances towards liberation of thought and identity.

I Have Not Always Shown Humility: Reclaiming Anne Boleyn’s Rhetoric

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Amanda Hayes

Abstract: Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII, is traditionally presented by historians and novelists alike as scheming, shrewish, and rhetorically inept. She challenged her audiences, rather than practicing the feminine submissiveness that was expected of women. This essay questions the notion that her rhetoric resulted from a failure to understand her audience or her own inability to control her speech. Reconsidering her rhetorical purposes and audiences opens up new avenues for questioning the gender constraints on Renaissance women and on modern women who seek positions of power, as well as how we think about rhetorical success.

Making Sense of #MeToo: Intersectionality and Contemporary Feminism

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Caroline Dadas

Abstract: Based on a review of 100 popular press articles about #MeToo, I offer a rhetorical analysis of the popular discourse surrounding the movement. I analyze two of the trends that emerged from the #MeToo popular press data that I gathered: the need for an increased intersectional approach; and the exposure of continued rifts in feminist thought. Through this approach, I situate the work of #MeToo as rhetorical, grounded in an understanding of how power functions and can be disrupted.

Writing Groups as Feminist Practice

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Janine Morris, Hannah J. Rule, and Christina M. LaVecchia


Early Quaker Women and Civility Rhetorics

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Kristina Lucenko


Feminist Citational Mapping as Recovery and Reconsideration: A Methodology for Analyzing Citational Practices

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Liz Lane, Lori Beth De Hertogh, and Jessica Ouellette


Museum of Modern Art’s “Margaret Scolari Barr Papers”

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Lynée Lewis Gaillet


The Rhetoric of Letter-Keeping

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Cheyenne Franklin


Dr. Battey’s Ovariotomy, 1872-1878

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Amber Nicole Brooks


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