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Writing Groups as Feminist Practice

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Janine Morris, Hannah J. Rule, and Christina M. LaVecchia


Early Quaker Women and Civility Rhetorics

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Kristina Lucenko


Feminist Citational Mapping as Recovery and Reconsideration: A Methodology for Analyzing Citational Practices

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Liz Lane, Lori Beth De Hertogh, and Jessica Ouellette


Museum of Modern Art’s “Margaret Scolari Barr Papers”

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Lynée Lewis Gaillet


The Rhetoric of Letter-Keeping

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Cheyenne Franklin


Dr. Battey’s Ovariotomy, 1872-1878

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Amber Nicole Brooks


Transforming Feminist Narratives and Participation of African Marginalized Women through Ceremonial Beads

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Mavis Boatemaa Beckson


Recoveries and Reconsiderations: Introduction

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Wendy Sharer


Editor’s Welcome

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 3 Spring 2020

Author(s): Jen Wingard


Re-Examining Intersectionality in Our 30th Year: A Remediation of the 2019 CFSHRC Action Hour

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 1 Fall/Winter 2019

Author(s): Tarez Samra Graban, Heather Adams, Jenny Unghba Korn, Lana Oweidat, Sarah Singer, and Jen England

Abstract: On March 13, 2019, the Coalition of Feminist Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition sponsored their annual Action Hour at the Conference on College Composition and Communication in Pittsburgh. This year's event had a dual focus. First, we gathered to interrogate and explore the critical vocabularies and representational frameworks that feminist scholars in rhetoric and composition had developed to to identify the fraught or hybrid spaces that they occupy, including but not limited to various intersections of sexism and racism. We did so both in response to Kimberlé Crenshaw's landmark texts, and in response to residual challenges of taking up Crenshaw's work authentically and well in all corners of our field. Second, we gathered to commemorate and celebrate the many labors and constant dedication of two esteemed colleagues and of thirteen past presidents. Individually and collectively, through their teaching and service and mentoring and scholarship, these women have left exceptional legacies, and we were glad to dwell together for an evening—in shared space, though on stolen land—to look back on those legacies, and to begin looking forward.

Review of Indigenous Rhetorics and Survival in the Nineteenth Century: A Yurok Woman Speaks Out

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Emily Legg


Review of Remembering Women Differently: Refiguring Rhetorical Work

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Amy E. Dayton


Review of Surrender: Feminist Rhetoric and Ethics in Love and Illness

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Ashley Canter


Review of My Life with Charles Billups and Martin Luther King: Trauma and the Civil Rights Movement

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Maegan Parker Brooks


Recipes for/of Subversion: The Rhetorical Strategies of The Suffrage Cookbook

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Lisa Mastrangelo

Abstract: Published in 1915, The Suffrage Cook Book reflected the ways that the suffrage movement, and the Equal Franchise Federation of Western Pennsylvania in particular, had changed from their original tactics, demonstrating genre adaptability by presenting more nuanced (and sometimes more pointed) ways of arguing for suffrage. While cookbooks offer an interesting overview of food history, analysis of the rhetorical methods of The Suffrage Cook Book reveals the group making thoughtful and complex rhetorical moves. Overall, the cookbook demonstrates the Franchise participating in a “new” version of “true” womanhood—one that is both placed squarely within traditional domestic behavior through cooking and attention to the hearth/home and family, but also reflects women who were politically savvy, slightly more progressive than the more conservative national suffrage movement, aware of their audiences, aware of new trends in nutrition and domestic science, and finally, witty, using humor and satire to try to convince their audience.

The Suffrage Centennial: How, Why, and on What Terms Should We Mark this Moment?

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Jessica Enoch


Imagining an Embodied Ethos: Serena Williams’ “Defiant” Black Ēthe

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Lorin Shellenberger

Abstract: Feminist scholars have critiqued Aristotelian ethos for not accounting for the material conditions that might influence how one’s ethos is perceived and assuming a certain agency for the rhetor, assumptions that do not always accurately depict a woman’s or other marginalized group’s lived reality. I argue that the physical body, ethos, and subjectivity are necessarily intertwined, and I offer the term embodied ēthe to complement Ryan, Meyers, and Jones’ work on expanding feminist understandings of ethos. Using tennis player Serena Williams as an exemplar, embodied ēthe is capable of inhabiting—not just resisting—social norms, which further expands the various modalities of action that might lead to one’s agency and the various actions that women might use to develop ethos.

Stories of Filipina Suffrage: Remembering Marginal Histories in Colonial Contexts

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Katie Bramlett


African American Women and the Rhetoric of “Dignified Agitation”

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Reva Sias


Intersectional Politics of Representation: The Rhetoric of Archival Construction in Women’s March Coalitional Memory

Peitho Volume 22 Issue 2 Winter 2020

Author(s): Rachel Chapman Daugherty


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